Monday, January 16, 2017

Chief......


.........The Last U.S. Cavalry Horse


H/T to Barb (http://barbacat.blogspot.com/) for the idea! Stop by her wonderful blog and get your smiles on!






Chief, The Last U.S. Cavalry Horse

Chief, the last U.S. Army cavalry horse, was foaled in 1932. The Army purchased him in 1940 from a Nebraska rancher, at Ft. Robinson, NE. He arrived at his cavalry post, Ft. Riley, KS. on 3 April 1941, assigned to the 10th Cavalry and later the 9th Cavalry. In June 1942, Chief was transferred to the Cavalry School (also at Ft.Riley) where he rose to the rank of Advanced Cavalry Charger. Chief remained at the school after his 1949 semi-retirement until his 1958 full retirement.
During the 1950s and early 1960s the number of retired cavalry horses declined until only Chief was left. For years, Chief enjoyed his retirement days in a corral at the Ft. Riley Riding Club. Each year, Chief entertained hundreds of visitors, a living repreentative of the more than 6,000 horses who were kept on post at Ft. Riley during WW II, as well as all Army horses. Finally, on 24 May 1968, Chief died, to join the millions of faithful cavalry horses who served and died before him. A military funeral with full honors was held, attended by the Commanding General of the U.S. Army.
Chief is buried at Ft. Riley, at the foot of the Old Trooper Monument (modeled after the Cavalry soldier drawing "Old Bill" by Fredric Remington.) Chief is buried upright, encased in a marble vault, ready to ride again.



:o)



16 comments :

  1. Interesting! Quite the vault for Chief!

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    1. A special place for a very special horse! :o)

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  2. Great post. Thanks to Barb from me also.

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    1. Lots of good vids of the real cavalry on YouTube!

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  3. As a child, my neighbor had a horse called Bill. He had his serial number on his neck and a circle C on his rump. We could slide off his back and he never flinched, two of us rode him every day.
    One day Mom had the radio on really loud, it was playing a Military march and Bill went into a routine that was amazing to watch. He danced, he pranced and at the end went into a full upstanding salute, rearing up on his back legs.
    This was about 1952 and Bill was 13 years old at the time.

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    1. What a great story, Granny! I hope he had many, many years left to enjoy his dancing and marching!

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    2. Indeed! Wish it could have been filmed. Must have amazed you when that happened.

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    3. Yes, it would have been a viral sensation. I have the video in my head and will never forget it. Thanks for the link.

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  4. My father was born and raised in El Paso, and would talk about visiting Fort Bliss as a child in the thirties.
    He did say that the historians never mention the byproduct of having a very large number of horses in one place.

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    1. LOL! But the landscaping must have been spectacular!

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  5. So would he have been a quarter horse then CM?

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    1. Probably a Morgan, Glenn - Don't think Quarter's were a standard breed in the early 40's.

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  6. Thank you for the link! As much as I have had to do with horses in my life, I never knew that story. My Dad was briefly stationed at Ft. Riley too... World War II veteran, him. I am busily scanning all of his remaining photographs from his time in the 850th Engineer Aviation Battalion.

    Fair Winds and thank you so much for the great 'horse story'. I will remember it and repeat it to my young nephews and nieces.

    Cap'n Jan

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    1. Bet you are having a fun time going through all the photographs! Must bring back some wonderful memories, Cap'n Jan! :o)

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