Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Anthony Howe, Sculptor

Just love his work!








Anthony Howe (born 1954, Salt Lake City, Utah) is an American kinetic sculptor who creates wind-driven sculptures resembling pulsing, alien creatures and vortices. He makes use of computer-aided design, shaping the metal components with a plasma cutter, and completing his work by use of traditional metalworking techniques.

Howe notably designed a cauldron and accompanying kinetic sculpture for the 2016 Summer Olympics.

He attended The Taft School between 1969 and 1973, and for the next 6 years was enrolled at Cornell University and Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. In 1979 he built a house on a remote mountaintop in New Hampshire. Here he painted pastoral landscapes for five years, and displayed his work at 'Gallery on the Green' in Lexington, Massachusetts. His paintings may be found in the collections of Teradyne, Harvard University, the William Small collection and other public and private collections.

In 1985 Howe moved to New York and turned from painting to kinetic sculpting. Four years later his first work was hung from old elevator cables stretched between buildings. In 1993 he joined the Kim Foster Gallery in New York, and the following year moved to Orcas Island in Washington, where he once again built a house and opened his own gallery.
“I attempt, with an economy of means, to construct objects whose visual references range from lo-tech sci-fi paraphernalia to microbiological or astronomical models. Utilizing primarily stainless steel armatures that are driven either by hammered curvilinear shapes or flat fiberglass covered discs, I hope the pieces assume a spare, linear elegance when conditions are still, mutating to raucous animation when the wind picks up. Multiple axis finely balanced forms, both symmetrical and asymmetrical, conspire to create a visually satisfying three-dimensional harmony.”
— Anthony Howe
He claims one of his methods of testing the sculptures is by fixing them to top of his van and then driving down the local airstrip.


In August 2015, Howe was offered the role of designing a cauldron for the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The games' organizers had decided to eschew a larger cauldron and flame as part of an effort to be environmentally conscious, resulting in the construction of a small cauldron with a larger kinetic sculpture to accompany it; the sculpture, which consists of ring of rotating bars, a 40 ft (12.2 m) in diameter, with reflective plates and spheres, was meant to enhance the appearance of the smaller flame, providing an effect inspired by the "pulsing energy and reflection of light" of the sun. The sculpture was designed at his studio on Orcas Island, with final construction occurring in Montreal before being shipped to Rio.


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sf

Today's funny :o)








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Just stuff

If you turn your volume WAY up you can hear the coyotes by us. 
Every night we get serenaded by them !


It FINALLY cooled down after that awful heat we've been having: This is the temp when I let the gang out in the morning:


 Coffee on the deck time!


 "Chief Charlie One Feather":


 Unusual to see all three laying down for a nap. Laverne hardly goes out of the pen anymore, but when she does, I have to carry her back. She tires easily now and sleeps most of the day.


The spaghetti squash is getting bigger and bigger:



 The moon in the morning:



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(Don't forget to turn your volume back down!)






Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Places I might want to see....


.... if I didn't have to fly in an airplane to get there......







Aiguille du Midi Bridge

Mont Blanc massif, French Alps, France

The Aiguille du Midi is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif in the French Alps. The name “Aiguille du Midi” translates literally as “Needle of the Noon” or “Needle of the Mid-day”.
Elevation: 3,842 m
First ascent: August 4, 1818
Prominence: 310 m
First ascenders: Antoni Malczewski, J. M. Balmat
Mountain range: Mont Blanc massif, Alps

Please visit: Wikipedia
for more detailed information!

(and let me know if you've been there!)

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Today's funny :o)







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Let's go for a ride!

Had to go to Home Depot last week - we took the back roads:


But first the cows - gotta have a pic of the cows!


An overgrown pretty field:

 Just a horse corral:


 The corn is getting high:


 Sunflowers - acres of them:




 Getting ready for the sunflower maze to open:



 Why our taxes went up - solar panels - UGH - what a rip-off!


 Lots of shale rock:


A fruit and veggie stand:

 Old barns:

Guess the roof caved in  - notice the blue tarp:

 Have no idea why I took this one:


 Looking down into the valley:


More old barns:

 This family runs a Christmas tree farm and gift shop:


 Another old barn:


This one is almost in the road!


 The trailer is full of chickens:


 This just makes me smile:

Lots and lots of windows on this one: 


That's it! 'Hope you enjoyed the ride!

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Monday, August 22, 2016

The Australian Mountain Katydid

An interesting insect found in the Eastern part of  Australia:






Museums Field Guide apps species profiles – terrestrial invertebrates

Brief description
Wispy antennae, mottled grey-brown, abdominal bands of crimson and blue, body-length to 5 cm.
Description
Female squat, long-legged and flightless; male more elongate and with fully-formed wings. Both sexes have long, wispy antennae. Colour mottled grey-brown, cream-white and black, but with bands of crimson and blue – normally hidden – along the edge of each abdominal segment. Body-length up to 5 cm.
Biology
These insects feed mostly on fireweeds and other herbs, from which they may assimilate toxins that make them distasteful to predators. They rely on camouflage to avoid detection. When threatened, females freeze while males emit a warning call. If further threatened, the wing-covers are raised and the abdomen arched and vibrated, revealing otherwise hidden bands of shimmering crimson and electric blue. Males also sing when defending territory or courting.
Habitat
Mostly high-altitude grasslands, heathlands and woodlands.
Native status
Native to Australia.
Maximum size (cm)
5
Diet
Herbivore
Dangerous
Usually harmless, but can bite.
Colours
black, white, grey, red, blue
Distribution
Eastern Australia

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