Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Dear readers


Wishing you a very Blessed Thanksgiving!

It's been a long road for our little family this year and we do want you to know
 that your kindness to us can never be repaid.




We hope you enjoy this Thanksgiving Day surrounded by love, memories, family and friends!

(Taking the rest of the week off - will be back on Monday)!


:o)

Today's funny :o)


                                                     ...still a favorite!!  LOL!








:o)

Got wood?

Hubby is a VERY busy man:






When we moved here, all this was wooded:






This is beyond the stone wall:



A neighbor gave us a nice, big pile of stones:






The girls eating corn kernels:




:o)





Monday, November 25, 2019

Friday, November 22, 2019

Friday Night Steam



We're off to Japan tonight! Sit back and enjoy this beauty!






The Class C62 (C62形) is a type of 4-6-4 steam locomotive built by Japanese National Railways (JNR) in Japan. The C classification indicates three sets of driving wheels. The C62 was built with a 4-6-4 frame, upon which was mounted the boiler of the JNR Class D52 2-8-2 locomotives.

These were the largest and fastest steam passenger locomotives to run in Japan, and hauled the Tsubame (swallow) express on the Tōkaidō Main Line between Tokyo and Osaka. Only South Africa operated more powerful Cape gauge locomotives. Forty-nine C62s were built from 1948 to 1949.Five C62s hauled the Teine express in Hokkaido between Otaru and Hakodate after they were displaced by electrification of the Tōkaidō Main Line. Two locomotives were used to double-head trains on the 2.5% (1:40) grades between Otaru and Oshamambe where they were a popular tourist and railfan attraction until 1971. The last examples in regular service were withdrawn in 1973.
A class C62 locomotive, C62 17, broke the speed record for a narrow-gauge steam locomotive on 15 December 1954 when it reached 129 km/h (80 mph) on the Tōkaidō Main Line. This locomotive was preserved in a park in Nagoya, and later moved to the SCMaglev and Railway Park in Nagoya.

The C62 has achieved a level of fame due in part to the manga/anime series Galaxy Express 999, in which the express is pulled by an advanced space locomotive that is built to replicate a C62.
The founders of Hudson Soft (rail fan brothers Yuji and Hiroshi Kudo) were fond of the C62 and other 4-6-4 locomotives, so they named the company after them: 4-6-4 configuration locomotives are also known as Hudsons or Hudson-types. Japan picked up the term from the USA (where the first 4-6-4 built was named after the Hudson River), the C60, C61, and C62 used many American design elements and conventions in their designs, apparently including class names. Hudson Soft also named a number of products after the C62, including the development kit for the PC Engine, and a chip (Hu62) that was used in a later version of the hardware. It was also the code name for their console before they settled on PC Engine.

As of 2012, five Class C62 locomotives were preserved at various locations around the country.
  • C62 1: Preserved at the Kyoto Railway Museum in Kyoto
  • C62 2: Preserved in working order by JR West at the Kyoto Railway Museum.  This locomotive wears a stainless steel swallow on its smoke deflector as a reminder of the era when it hauled the famous Tsubame express.
  • C62 3: Preserved at JR Hokkaido's Naebo Works in Sapporo, Hokkaido
  • C62 17: On display at the SCMaglev and Railway Park in Nagoya
  • C62 26: On display at the Kyoto Railway Museum

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JNR_Class_C62

 
Image result for japan steam engine c6120



:o)




Today's funny :o)







:o)



Freedom!!!




 Cleaned the coop and let the gang out for a bit. 
The girls loved it but Benji was a little nervous at first! . . :




The inspectors making sure I got rid of all the poopies:
 
 

Four eggs!

 


 A giant oak leaf and...

 

... a feathered cloud:

 


 A good day in Coopville!


 

:o)

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

A really, really cool.....



.................  turtle!





Mary River Turtle Mary River Turtle, Elusor macrurusSource: http://bit.ly/2BguozD Photo Credit: YOUTUBE/HOWSTUFFWORKS Mary River Turtle Facts The remarkable Mary River Turtle represents a highly unusual variety of reptile, as you can see for yourself. In addition to being rather different from many other turtles, it bears the distinction of not being identified until in 1994. Sadly, this distinctive species also has an extremely restricted range of habitation, making it quite vulnerable. Therefore, the IUCN currently lists it as Endangered, pending further information on its numbers. For the obvious reason, many people in its native region also know this fascinating animal as the green haired turtle. Related Articles Olive Ridley Sea Turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea Olive Ridley Sea Turtle Green Sea Turtle, Chelonia mydas Green Sea Turtle Kemps Ridley Sea Turtle, Lepidochelys kempii Kemps Ridley Sea Turtle Mary River Turtle, Elusor macrurusSource: http://bit.ly/2FZjjHb Photo Credit: J Cann/Nature Focus Mary River Turtle Physical Description In addition to its different appearance, the Mary River Turtle also ranks as one of the physically largest in its endemic range. Multiple examples of this animal with a carapace length measuring as much as 20 in (50 cm) have been observed. The carapace also grows elongated in comparison to related species. It also appears as either plain in color or with intricate patterns. Also uniquely, the tail grows much longer than that of most other turtles. It often measures two-thirds the length of the carapace. The most noticeable feature, however, remains the strands of green algae, resembling hair, that covers many specimens. Finally, it also has the highly unusual, for a turtle, ability to breathe underwater, via special glands…located near the genitals. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: Testudines Family: Chelidae Genus: Elusor Species: E. macrurus Mary River Turtle, Elusor macrurusSource: http://bit.ly/2S0qllt Photographer: NKGKing CC License: http://bit.ly/2IjEG4n Mary River Turtle Distribution, Habitat, and Ecology Quite sadly, the sincerely fascinating Mary River Turtle also appears to only inhabit an extremely small portion of Australia. There, the only known representatives of the species live in the Mary River, hence the name, in southeast Queensland. Unfortunately, researchers currently have very little confirmed information about the ecology of this recently recognized species. It inhabits regions of flowing water, and makes its nest on dry ground. In addition, individuals take longer to mature than many related turtles. This reptile, like many others, also has an omnivorous diet. It commonly feeds on a wide variety of plants and small prey. Species Sharing Its Area Western Underground Orchid, Rhizanthella gardneri Western Underground Orchid Giant Pink Slug Giant Pink Slug Kimberly Deathadder, Acanthophis cryptamydros Kimberly death adder Check out our other articles on Berca Mud Volcanoes, Mycena Chlorophus, Giant Manta Ray, Onyx River Reddit Share19 Pin Tweet WhatsApp 19 Shares Written by Todd Sain Sr. · Categorized: Reptiles · Tagged: IUCN Reader Interactions Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Comment Name * Email * Website This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Footer Get Instant Updates Free Wallpapers Show your support for the amazing places and species we raise awareness of by downloading a free wallpaper. Green Tips for You We try to make caring for our planet a viral cause. Follow these green tips for a more sustainable living. There's more green information here. Write for Us If you are a nature enthusiast, if you care about our amazing planet and want to be part of our cause we would love to hear from you! Our Supporters Google-Logo1 Screamingfrog-Logo1 Hotjar-Logo-1 inkybee-logo Ninja-Otreach-Logo-e1505318180208 Canva-Logo-copy-1 urlprofiler-1 Forecheck-Logo-1 SEOprofiler-Logo-1 © 2019 · Our Breathing Planet · Privacy and Cookies · Legal Notice · Sitemap This site uses cookies. Find out more. Reddit Share19 Pin Tweet WhatsApp 19

Read more at Our Breathing Planet: Mary River Turtle http://bit.ly/2Sb7x2h







Mary River Turtle Facts
  • The remarkable Mary River Turtle represents a highly unusual variety of reptile, as you can see for yourself.
  • In addition to being rather different from many other turtles, it bears the distinction of not being identified until in 1994.
  • Sadly, this distinctive species also has an extremely restricted range of habitation, making it quite vulnerable.
  • Therefore, the IUCN currently lists it as Endangered, pending further information on its numbers.
  • For the obvious reason, many people in its native region also know this fascinating animal as the green haired turtle.
www.ourbreathingplanet.com/mary-river-turtle/
Mary River Turtle Distribution, Habitat, and Ecology Quite sadly, the sincerely fascinating Mary River Turtle also appears to only inhabit an extremely small portion of Australia. There, the only known representatives of the species live in the Mary River, hence the name, in southeast Queensland. Unfortunately, researchers currently have very little confirmed information about the ecology of this recently recognized species. It inhabits regions of flowing water, and makes its nest on dry ground. In addition, individuals take longer to mature than many related turtles. This reptile, like many others, also has an omnivorous diet. It commonly feeds on a wide variety of plants and small prey.

Read more at Our Breathing Planet: Mary River Turtle http://bit.ly/2Sb7x2h



:o)






Tocday's funny :o)



Oh, no - another "blonde" joke!


A blonde was driving home after a game & got caught in a really bad hailstorm.. Her car was covered with dents, so the next day she took it to a repair shop.


The shop owner saw that she was a blonde, so he decided to have some fun.He told her to go home, blow into the tail pipe really hard & all the dents would pop out. 


So, the blonde went home, got down on her hands & knees & started blowing into her tailpipe.


Nothing happened.


So she blew a little harder & still nothing happened. 


Her blonde roommate saw her & asked, 'What are you doing?'


The first blonde told her how the repairman had instructed her to blow into the tail pipe in order to get all the dents to pop out. 


The roommate rolled her eyes & said, 'Duh, like hello!
You need to roll up the windows first.'






                       See the source image
:o)


Poor Wilma!

It was a yucky day yesterday..



.. so I made a batch of spaghetti treats for the gang:




They go wild over it - 




but one of the new hens attacked Wilma

 



 (She's molting and very quiet and timid right now). She was pecked so hard she stumbled and walked backwards into the pen gate. She tried to eat more, but couldn't.



Even Benji ran from the mean hen 

 


and went back into the pen



It certainly wasn't a good day for the old gal!

The damn bear has been back - the gate to the run was open this morning and my neighbor's iron bird bath was knocked over again.

 We decided to pull in the suet bird feeders until the weather gets really, really cold. 

The second portion of the NJ bear hunt starts December 9th. 
'Hope they get this pesky  one!

:o)




Monday, November 18, 2019

What the heck is a Nudibranch???


Let's find out!







Description

Nudibranchs are mollusks in the class Gastropoda, which includes snails, slugs, limpets, and sea hairs. Many gastropods have a shell. Nudibranchs have a shell in their larval stage, but it disappears in the adult form. Gastropods also have a foot and all young gastropods undergo a process called ​​torsion in their larval stage. In this process, the entire top of their body twists 180 degrees on their foot. This results in the placement of the gills and anus above the head, and adults that are asymmetrical in form.
The word nudibranch comes from the Latin word nudus (naked) and Greek brankhia (gills), in reference to the gills or gill-like appendages which protrude from the backs of many nudibranchs. They also may have tentacles on their heads that help them smell, taste, and get around. A pair of tentacles called rhinophores on the nudibranch's head have scent receptors that allow the nudibranch to smell its food or other nudibranchs. Because the rhinophores stick out and can be a target for hungry fish, most nudibranchs have the ability to withdraw the rhinophores and hide them in a pocket in their skin if the nudibranch senses danger.


Redline Flabellina - Nudibranch

Species

There are over 3,000 species of nudibranchs, and new species are still being discovered. They range in size from microscopic to over a foot and a half long and can weigh up to just over 3 pounds. If you've seen one nudibranch, you haven't seen them all. They come in an astonishingly wide variety of colors and shapes—many have brightly colored stripes or spots and flamboyant appendages on their head and back. Some species are transparent and/or bio-luminescent, like the Phylliroe.
Nudibranchs thrive in an enormous variety of underwater environments, from shallow, temperate, and tropic reefs to Antarctica and even hydrothermal vents.


Nudibranch, Hypselodoris kanga. Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia. Bali Sea, Indian Ocean

Suborders

Two main suborders of nudibranchs are dorid nudibranchs (Doridacea) and aeolid nudibranchs (Aeolidida). Dorid nudibranchs, like the Limacia cockerelli, breathe through gills that are on their posterior (back) end. Aeolid nudibranchs have cerata or finger-like appendages that cover their back. The cerata can be a variety of shapes—thread-like, club-shaped, clustered, or branched. They have multiple functions, including breathing, digestion, and defense.

Habitat and Distribution

Nudibranchs are found in all the world's oceans, from cold water to warm water. You might find nudibranchs in your local tide pool, while snorkeling or diving on a tropical coral reef, or even in some of the coldest parts of the ocean or in thermal vents.
They live on or near the sea floor and have been identified at depths between 30 and 6,500 feet below the ocean surface.

Diet

Most Nudibranchs eat using a radula, a toothed structure that they use to scrape off prey from the rocks they cling to; some suck out the prey after predigesting its tissue with selected enzymes, rather like a wasp. They are carnivorous, so that prey includes sponges, coral, anemones, hydroids, barnacles, fish eggs, sea slugs, and other nudibranchs. Nudibranchs are picky eaters—individual species or families of nudibranchs may eat only one kind of prey. Nudibranchs get their bright colors from the food they eat. These colors may be used for camouflage or to warn predators of the poison that lies within.
The Spanish shawl nudibranch (Flabellina iodinea) feeds on a species of hydroid called Eudendrium ramosum, which possesses a pigment called astaxanthin that gives the nudibranch its brilliant purple, orange, and red coloration.
Some nudibranchs, like the Blue Dragon, create their own food by eating coral with algae. The nudibranch absorbs the algae's chloroplasts (zooxanthellae) into the cerata, which acquire nutrients by photosynthesis using the sun to sustain the nudibranch for months. Others have evolved other ways of farming zooxanthellae, housing them in their digestive gland.

Behavior

The sea slugs can see light and dark, but not their own brilliant coloration, so the colors are not intended to attract mates. With their limited vision, their sense of the world is obtained through their rhinophores (on top of the head) and oral tentacles (near the mouth). Not all nudibranchs are colorful; some use defensive camouflage to match the vegetation and hide, some can change their colors to fit, some hide their bright colors only to bring them out to warn off predators.
Nudibranchs move on a flat, broad muscle called a foot, which leaves a slimy trail. While most are found on the ocean floor, some can swim short distances in the water column by flexing their muscles. Some even swim upside down.
Aeolid nudibranchs can use their cerata for defense. Some of their prey such as Portuguese man-of-wars have a specialized cell in their tentacles called nematocysts that contain a barbed or venomous coiled thread. Nudibranchs eat the nematocysts and store them in the nudibranch's cerata where they can be used late to sting predators. Dorid nudibranchs make their own toxins or absorb toxins them from their food and release those into the water when needed.
Despite the unsavory or toxic taste they can present to their non-human predators, most nudibranchs are harmless to humans, except those like Glaucus atlanticus which consumes nematocytes and so may consider you a predator and sting.

Reproduction and Offspring

Nudibranchs are hermaphrodites, meaning that they have reproductive organs of both sexes. Because they can't move too far, too fast and are solitary in nature, it's important for them to be able to reproduce if the situation presents itself. Having both sexes means that they can mate with any adult that happens to pass by.
Nudibranchs lay masses of spiral-shaped or coiled eggs, which are for the most part left on their own. The eggs hatch into free-swimming larvae which eventually settle onto the ocean bottom as adults. Only one species of nudibranch, the Pteraeolidia ianthina, exhibits parental care by guarding the newly-laid egg masses.

Nudibranchs and Humans

Scientists study nudibranchs because of their complex chemical makeup and adaptations. They have rare or novel chemical compounds which possess anti-microbial and anti-parasitic traits which may aid in the fight against cancer.
Studies of nudibranch DNA also offer assistance in tracking ocean conditions relative to climate change.

Threats

These beautiful animals don't live very long; some live up to a year, but some only for a few weeks. The global population of nudibranchs is currently unassessed—researchers are still discovering new ones each year—but field observations such as that conducted by Endangered Species International suggest that many species are becoming rare, due to water pollution, degradation, habitat loss, and biodiversity decline associated with global warming.

Source: https://www.thoughtco.com/facts-about-nudibranchs-2291859


:o)



Today's funny :o)











:o)

Quiet weekend



When I let the gang out Saturday morning, Benji didn't join the girls. I opened the back door and he was up on the roost bar!  I know he didn't spend the whole night there because the nest box he usually sleeps in was full of poopsies. At least he's trying! He hasn't crowed in a few days, either. I sure do wish he would grow up!




The weather has been cold and windy and the geese are still heading South:



No much going on in Coopville because of the cold weather, but Hubby has been busy gathering logs for the fireplace. It's been so cold he's been using those hand warmer packets inside of his gloves!






:o)

Friday, November 15, 2019

Friday Night Steam


We're off to Borneo tonight!













Celebrate Asia: Travel back in time on Borneo’s oldest running steam train

by Theresa Tan

09 Nov 2019

In our ongoing series looking at unique people, places and food in the region, CNA Lifestyle hopped on the North Borneo Railway in Sabah. All aboard?

The North Borneo Railway steam train is the oldest running one in Sabah. (Photo: Sutera Harbour Resort)

Fancy stepping back into the colonial charm of British North Borneo? A distinctly memorable way to enjoy Borneo’s verdant greenery is to indulge in the luxury of steam train travel aboard the North Borneo Railway.
You would be enjoying the views from the vintage Vulcan steam engine, manufactured by the Vulcan Foundry Ltd, in Lancashire, UK – the last of a fleet of locomotives that have travelled across Borneo since the 1880s.
Here's a distinctly memorable way to enjoy Borneo’s verdant greenery: Indulge in the luxury of steam train travel aboard the North Borneo Railway.

The North Borneo Railway is a joint project between the Sutera Harbour Resort and the Sabah State Railway Department launched in 2000 to commemorate Kota Kinabalu achieving city status. It is the only train that services the island of Borneo, and runs twice a week from Tanjung Aru in Kota Kinabalu.
The carriages were designed in the 19th century with unique oakwood, fabric seats and panel lamps that go back a hundred years.
Covering 38.5km between Kota Kinabalu, the state capital of Sabah, and Papar, an agricultural town known as the “rice bowl of Sabah”, thanks to the paddy fields that dominate the area, this railway offers a unique sight-seeing experience for visitors, from views of the South China Sea to protected forests.
ALL IN THE DETAILS
For train enthusiasts – or fans of Agatha Christie or Harry Potter, for that matter – riding the North Borneo Railway train promises to be a treat in itself. The Vulcan has been beautifully maintained and remains in mint condition. The non-air-conditioned train allows passengers the opportunity to enjoy the fresh air as it travels through the rainforest of Borneo.

The North Borneo Railway steam train
It is the only train that services the island of Borneo, and runs twice a week from Tanjung Aru in Kota Kinabalu in Sabah. (Photo: Ananya Pictures)
Painted a rich deep teal and cream, the train and its carriages bear the gold emblem of a tiger holding a wheel. Inside each carriage are eight two-person seats set face to face and separated by a table. These seats are elegantly upholstered in regimental striped-fabric. The wooden frames are polished and all bear the railway emblem.

“The carriages were designed in the 19th century with unique oakwood, fabric seats and panel lamps that go back a hundred years,” shared Gerard Tan, deputy chief executive officer of Sutera Harbour Resort.



Interiors of the North Borneo Railway train
The interiors of the train retain its old-school charm. (Photo: Ananya Pictures)
He added that to get and keep the steam engine going, an age-old fuelling method is employed. “This train uses only a very unique wood called mangrove. To get the mangrove wood is not easy. You have to cut and then you have to dry it and it’s very expensive.”
Incidentally, Sabah has the largest mangrove area of any state in Malaysia – over 232,000 hectares. However, much of this area is protected under conservation laws as mangroves are home to diverse flora and fauna.

The North Borneo Railway steam train
The train passes through paddy fields, villages, temples, mountains at a very slow speed. (Photo: Sutera Harbour Resort)
THE JOURNEY
“The train passes through paddy fields, villages, temples, and mountains at a very slow speed that turns back the clock 123 years,” said Tan.
The North Borneo Railway experience begins in Kota Kinabalu, at Tanjung Aru Station. Passengers are greeted at the platform by train stewards outfitted in colonial-era uniforms, complete with brass buttons and pith helmets. Upon receiving their train passports and boarding passes, passengers proceed to board the carriages and prepare to enjoy the service and the natural charms of Sabah.
Leaving Kota Kinabalu behind as it pulls out of the station, the train heads towards Putatan, beyond which lies the countryside of Sabah. The sector of the journey runs through the coast of Lokawi Bay and passengers are treated to views of the South China Sea.
The first stop, lasting 15 minutes, is Kinarut, an idyllic town 20km away from Kota Kinabalu. A traditional trading village, its old-world charm can be found in its architecture. Passengers can take a short stroll to experience the ambience or view the ancient Tien Nam Shi temple.

Departing from Kinarut, the train continues through Kawang, wherein lies the Kawang Forest Reserve. Kawang is a popular destination for trekkers and those who enjoy outdoor adventures.
The train continues past mangroves, through the Pengalat tunnel and across the Papar River over a steel trestle bridge and into Papar Town. This is a main stop on the railway track. The township of Paper is located between the coast of Sabah and the Crocker Range, the state’s highest mountain range that separates the west and east coast of Sabah.
The Vulcan has been beautifully maintained and remains in mint condition. The non-air-conditioned train allows passengers the opportunity to enjoy the fresh air as it travels through the rainforest of Borneo.
In the township, a great way to enjoy the local lifestyle is to visit and take in the sights, sounds and scents of the markets markets and mingle with the friendly people.
As passengers shop and enjoy Papar Town, the train is reloaded with firewood. Train enthusiasts will enjoy watching the locomotive change direction on the wheelhouse.
DINING ON THE TRAIN
A large part of the charm of riding the North Borneo Railway is dining on board. The train is staffed by a team of 13 stewards, stewardesses and chefs, along with a train supervisor.

Breakfast is served as the train departs from Tanjung Aru. Train supervisor Armin Bin Taman explained: “The food preparations start the day before at the hotel (Sutera Harbour Resort). We cook the dishes on Wednesday or Saturday morning, and bring them to the train before departure.” Prep work is done on board the train, the food is heated and served during meal times.

Breakfast is served as the train leaves Tanjung Aru. “We have payis ubi, kuih penjeram, curry puffs and roti kahwin,” listed Armin. Meals are served using cutlery and coffee cups from the colonial British era – a unique experience for most passengers.

Interiors of the North Borneo Railway train with meals served in tiffin carriers
Passengers enjoy lunch served in tiffin carriers, a touch of old-school Sabah. (Photo: Ananya Pictures)
On the two-hour journey back, passengers enjoy lunch served in a traditional tiffin carrier. “The tiffin meals are a touch of old-school Sabah, reflecting Borneo’s multi-cultural identity,” said Armin. Tiffin carriers were a convenient way to carry meals during a commute in the days of old, and tiffin was a light meal served instead of lunch.
The North Borneo Railway only operates twice a week because each round trip requires extensive preparation.
On the North Borneo Railway, however, the tiffin is fairly substantial: “We have fish curry, nasi bukit, chicken percik, sayur paku pakis and prawns,” he added.
As they draw close to the end of their train journey, passengers are treated to snacks, said the train supervisor. “We have a fruit platter at the end we serve coffee and tea and ice cream potong.”

STEPPING BACK IN TIME
The North Borneo Railway only operates twice a week because each round trip requires extensive preparation. For one, these trains use a vast amount of energy to build up steam pressure, Tan explained. Also, it is a precious piece of the past that belongs to Borneo.

Nevertheless, the experience of taking a journey aboard these British Pullman carriages is unparalleled. “It takes you back to the glamorous age of luxury train travel,” said Tan, “reminiscent of the 20s and 30s.”
“It is our pride; it is something very unique,” he said. “We will maintain it as long as it can last. Hopefully, perpetually.”
Armin added: “I feel proud because this is a train that still exists and it’s in Borneo. I hope this train will be maintained for future generations as they would not know that a train like this still exists.”

:o)

Today's funny :o)


Awwwww...




:o)


It's been cold...

.... here in Coopville for the past few days:



Wednesday morning:




Yesterday morning:



Even the darn damn deer are running around trying to keep warm!



The sunsets have been beautiful, though:




A crow letting me know the hawk is around again:




The gang just chilling out:




Benji like to lay down behind the pen gate. I always put fresh hay down for him. 
The girls don't seem to chase him when he's there. (Unless THEY want that spot)!

I gave them spaghetti as a treat, but by the time I went back to the house to get the camera,
it was all gone! Next time I'll have to bring it with me. It's so much fun to watch them fight over it!

:o)



Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Stuff you never think about


George Washington's teeth!!!









:o)



Today's funny :o)


A big H/T to Donna!







:o)

Uh-Oh.....


..... looks like it's a-gonna be a loooong Winter in Coopville!






Woolly Bear Caterpillar:  A Winter Weather Predictor or Not?


Most people in the Midwest or New England have heard at one time or another that if you want a forecast for the upcoming winter that you should just look for a woolly bear (black at both ends and a reddish brown or rust colored in the middle) or fuzzy bear caterpillar.  This same caterpillar is called the woolly worm in southern United States.  Yet another name for this caterpillar is the Hedgehog Caterpillar, because it curls into a tight bristly ball and “plays dead” when picked up or disturbed.  Whatever name they go by, they are often found in the autumn after they have left their food plants (variety of grasses and weeds including plantain, dandelion, and nettles) in search of a dark and sheltered spot where they can hibernate as larvae for the winter.
The Woolly Bear (Pyrrharctia isabella) Caterpillar is found across the United States, Canada, and Mexico.  The picture above is from Wagner, David L., Valerie Giles, Richard C. Reardon, and Michael L. McManus.  1997.  Caterpillars of Eastern Forests.  U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team, Morgantown, West Virginia.  FHTET-96-34. 113 pp.  Jamestown, ND: Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center Home Page.
The Woolly Bear (Pyrrharctia isabella) Caterpillar is found across the United States, Canada, and Mexico. 

Woolly Bear Folklore:

According to folklore, the amount of black on the woolly bear in autumn varies proportionately with the severity of the coming winter in the locality where the caterpillar is found.  The longer the woolly bear's black bands, the longer, colder, snowier, and more severe the winter will be. 
 
Similarly, the wider the middle brown band is associated with a milder upcoming winter.  The position of the longest dark bands supposedly indicates which part of winter will be coldest or hardest.  If the head end of the caterpillar is dark, the beginning of winter will be severe.  If the tail end is dark, the end of winter will be cold. In addition, the woolly bear caterpillar has 13 segments to its body, which traditional forecasters say correspond to the 13 weeks of winter.
As with most folklore, there are 2 other versions to this story.  The first one says that the woolly bear caterpillar's coat will indicate the upcoming winter's severity.  So, if its coat is very woolly, it will be a cold winter.  The final version deals with the woolly bear caterpillar's direction of travel of the worms.  It is said that woolly bear's crawling in a southerly direction are trying to escape the cold winter conditions of the north.  On the other hand, woolly bear's crawling on a northward path would indicate a mild winter.

:o(